Kaz Mitchell draws upon several styles of counselling in her practice, to maximise the potential for lasting benefits for the client.  This is often referred to as Integrative Counselling.  There are, however, three methods of counselling that she draws upon more than others, and these are Person Centred, Existential Therapy and Motivational Interviewing.

PERSON CENTRED COUNSELLING

Carl Rogers is the founder of the person, or client, centred approach to counselling and fundamentally this is based on the idea that we are all experts in our own lives, if we can only learn to trust our own instincts and look within for the answers to our problems.  In this way, Kaz will be guided by you and follow your lead in terms of what is important to you and she will assist you (through careful and attentive listening) to find your way through whatever issues you are trying to resolve.  The experience of this approach should leave you feeling deeply understood and respected by your counsellor in a genuine interaction that feels non-judgmental.  

EXISTENTIAL THERAPY

Based on the writings of existential philosophy as well as psychotherapy, this approach seeks to help clients understand themselves from a deeper, richer and more expansive standpoint.  It explores our anxieties about life and death, and how to learn to push through the fears and insecurities we feel in order to live life more fully.  It is not so technique driven as many other therapies, and instead focuses on conversations about living and what is important to the client.  Emmy van Deurzen, a prominent existential therapist, explains this form of therapy as assisting clients to come to terms with the dilemmas of living.  

MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING

This approach models itself on person centred counselling with an emphasis on helping clients to increase their change talk in order for them to make the changes they wish to make but have so far been unable to do successfully.  Again, it is an exploration of what is important to the client and what gets in the way of committing to change, and the counsellor acts as a guide rather than an expert who has all of the answers.  The aim is to help the client sort out the ambivalent thoughts and feelings they have about certain situations and support them to make a decision that makes sense.